Jessica Bibbee

Posts Tagged ‘understand’

20110719

In aphorism, proverb on 20110719 at 10:14

The desert dweller prays for rain, but is prepared not for the storm.

The fool waits for the rains to sow his seeds.

The fool tames a beast he cannot feed.

Fantasy is the reality of the fool.

To judge another’s rationale is simply to impose one’s own motive upon another’s actions.

Climax not without the crescendo; lo, the fool is clueless, the wise is cognizant of.

Life, ’tis a puzzle.

Cast a worm, catch a fish.
[Other times, cast a worm, drown a worm.]

The fool act without understanding.
The lay do not act, understanding only of consequence.
The dilettante do not act, understanding not of impact.
The wise act with understanding of impact.

Consequence impels the fool; impact propels the wise.

Hold experience dearly, opinions loosely.

Project that which is beneficial to others;
Retain that which is worthy of possession;
Relinquish all else.

The wise balance output with input, teaching with learning, giving with receiving, apology with forgiveness.

Prudence in opinion, abundance in perception.

Share candid opinions as you would fresh onions -sparingly and with consideration.

From the valley, espy the peak.

Cash not backed by gold is but pretty paper.

20110320

In aphorism, proverb on 20110320 at 17:06

Tolerance and acceptance are synonymous not with condonation, but more so, understanding.

A hammer can be used for bludgeoning or for building.

Regret is remedied only by action, never by apathy.

20110224

In aphorism, proverb, rumination on 20110224 at 11:50

Fear finds the able man lame.

Mankind is not born with equal ability, but without equal opportunity, true ability is never to be.

Life bears only the rules we impose on it.

Silence is often, not a slight, but a stall.

One needn’t give up sight of the pear to savor the peach.

The distant rose bears no thorns; but neither is her scent to be savored.

The curse of the woman is simply thus: if a she is to truly know a man, she must sacrifice her flesh that he might share his mind.

Great is the leader who can unite foes, not in purpose, but in recognizing similarity, extending fellowship, and furthering understanding.

Make-believe in childhood makes belief in adulthood.

20110206

In aphorism, chinese, proverb on 20110206 at 11:57

Tis better to let go than to lose. 扔不如送。

The scab that bleeds has yet to heal.

Fear bears preconceptions, breeds misunderstanding.

To only eat and sleep is more tiresome than to exercise. 光吃光睡比锻炼还要累。

20101123

In aphorism, proverb, rumination, tale on 20101123 at 11:23

Apathy is fear, incognito.
Anger is fear, unleashed.
Action is fear, confronted.

With folded hands and closed eyes, we choose to be the fool, the dead, or the wise.

《Learning to BE》
The child asks the elder, “How to BE?”

The elder utters, “Child, close your eyes and fold your hands. And you will find the wisdom to BE”.

The child scans the earth and rebuts, “It is the fool that fold their hands idly and close their eyes tightly. I do not wish to be a fool, I simply wish to BE.”

Again the elder says, “Child, close your eyes and fold your hands. And the wisdom to BE, you will find.”

Hands raised to the sky, again the child refutes, “It is the dead that rest infinitely with eyes aclosed and hands afolded. I do not wish to be dead, I simply wish to BE!”

One last time, the elder states, “Child, your able hands are raised upwards, yet you fail to grasp; your eyes are opened wide, yet you fail to see. -That if all you wish for, is simply to BE, it is but with folded hands and closed eyes, that you shall understand -you already ARE.”

20101005

In aphorism, poetry, proverb on 20101005 at 18:37

If the only way to fight fear is to understand it, then we must bear shields of tolerance and fashion weapons of compassion.

《Changdeok, Seoul》
Palace grounds made of stone
Palace walls made of wood
the setting sun hath shone
what might such beauty could.

20100322

In aphorism, proverb on 20100322 at 22:36

The voice of reason is never raised.

Art should express; the written word should communicate.

A thirsty camel is a drought on the way out.

The pot that boils over, boils dry.

Let us soften our inner wolf and incite our inner sheep.

The lost sheep finds a waiting world lies beyond the pasture.

Spend more time questioning your own convictions and more time understanding others’ beliefs.

20100111

In question, rumination on 20100111 at 17:47

Over the years, I have pondered much the notion of respect –what it does mean and what it does not mean. While it may be foolish to try to define it rigidly or simplistically, I find value in pursuing a truer understanding of it. To disregard the exploration of the abstraction or ambiguity surrounding respect, is to simply default to a superficial definition of respect.

a question

How do the terms ‘survivalism’ and ‘selfishness’ pertain to ‘respect’?

Survivalism may encompass an act or a choice made, cognitively or otherwise, that without being made would lead to the destruction of the self, and by exaggerated extension, the human race. Literally, to survive is to simply to continue [the] existence [of an entity, being.]

Selfishness may describe those actions or choices made, on matters that do not endanger the continuation of one’s existence, and in fact, may create frivolous benefits at the expense of another’s survival. Literally, to be selfish is simply to lack consideration of others.

intersection

I believe these two concepts intersect at [or diverge from] a common point, namely respect. I summarize ‘respect’ as “the cognizant compromise of the superfluous desires of the self for the preservation of the basic needs of another.”

When I directly devalue the needs of another at the mere gratification of myself, do I disrespect another. When I value another’s intrinsic rights by relinquishing my desires unessential, do I respect another. Without an intrinsic understanding of this, one is even incapable of respecting the self, and by extension, another.

Disrespect is born via the cognitive acknowledgment, or ignorance of, the sometimes subtle and highly relative distinction of ‘need’ vs. ‘want’.

defining by opposite

Defining what is a ‘need’  or what is ‘essential’ is no abecedarian task. Similarly, defining what is ‘superfluous’ or what is merely a ‘desire’ is better left to the omniscient.

But reality defies the ideality of accurately distinguishing between ‘needs’ and ‘wants’, and so demands otherwise; the one left to practice respect is, ultimately, the common person –you and I.

Perhaps a need is but something we have, if even without wanting it; a desire is but something we want, if only without having it. In quantitative terms, a ‘need’ might have a negative value; a ‘want’ might have a positive value, with survival hovering only at a neutral value between, zero.

Looking at the meanings opposite of ‘survival’ and ‘selfless’, only then, may it be possible to gain a better understanding of where or how these concepts truly intersect to better realize respect, as not only a relative abstraction, but as a tangible reality.

That which speaks not of survival speaks not of life. It speaks of peril and all that perishes.

That which speaks not of the selfish speaks of all that is selfless. It speaks not only of generosity and all that is altruistic, but also of applied philanthropic action.

what it is

Respect is a choice; it is not a simple definition carved out of infallible stone. It is a choice made by the fallible, by the common person, which speaks of a regard for life, of a concern for others.

Respect speaks of sought-out understanding –both of the self, as well as a willed understanding of others.

And living mindfully in the balance between.

Note: Access to WordPress is still blocked within China. Without access to a much appreciated VPN (proxy), I would be unable to publish to my blog from within mainland China. Thus, I am blessed and grateful to be sharing. With every post, I hereby protest the oppressive nature of the Chinese government blocking access to any part of the web.

20091206

In aphorism, poetry, proverb on 20091206 at 17:16

A cake in the oven follows its own time.

We may best understand who we are, simply by knowing who we are not.

《the rose》
The rose from a stranger distant is forgotten.
The rose from a lover near is held dear.
The rose from an admirer unnamed is held forever.

20091110

In aphorism, proverb, rumination, tale on 20091111 at 01:28

In a land far away, in a time long ago, there was a man who had enough and had he not just enough, but to excess had he. His hours were long, his toils sincere, and his earnings quite dear. He ate well, he lived well, and he slept well. For this was a man with enough to spare and did he, with others share. For this, he was well regarded by his brethren, kin and neighbor, too. Even his foes kept a fond distance, for they were few and their character untrue, with only the cowardice of envy to spare. And so, the man slept well and he lived well.

It was common in those times, as in times now, for like to live by like. And so it happened that in a dwelling nearby lived a second man, well to do as he was. This man, too, had more than enough, enough even to excess. He ate well and he lived well, but he did not sleep well. Though his hours were likewise long, his toils were not sincere. The wind hums in question, how were his earnings dear? With cunning and not without conniving, this second man pondered and plotted his hours away. He left his toils to others near, that they may have reason not to stray. And stray they did not, their fear keeping them near. His foes were neither few and ever nearer they drew. Respect for this man fell away; in its place, stood only their contempt. And so, the second man, though he lived seemingly well, did not sleep so well.

It was true in those times, as in times now, that where a mountain stands tall, a valley lays nearby. And so it were that a third man lived not so far from the first and second men. But though he ate well enough, he did not live well and he did not sleep well. His toils were many and his hours even more. And whilst he would utter not such words, it was for the second man that he toiled so. Neither foe had he, nor friends with which to be. His hours filled with anger true and one part angst, and toil alone did he. And so, the third man did not sleep well, because he did not live well.

It was inevitable in those days, as in days of now, that where the sun shines upon a tree, never the land below is a golden ray to see. And so there was a fourth man, who served below all the others. Of excess and its meaning he understood not, knowing it to be a thing only that he lacked. His toil was not much, his time of rest neither more. For his hours were long and he never knew when, if, it would end. Foes he had not; for nothing did they fear nor more was there to envy dear. Friends were likewise few, too afraid of filth to stand even near. He ate not well, and by no man’s standard did he live well. But he did sleep well. With little to weigh him down and not a regret to hold him back, only the night was his friend, ever to return and always to keep him until the morn. And so, the fourth man did not live well, but he slept so very well.

With a heavy heart do we toil away what otherwise would we idle, or with light heart shall we rest when the day has met its end and bids farewell the eve.

This story of four men is but a tale of two: two ways to eat, two ways to sleep, and keeping true –there are but two ways to live.